Men and Women’s Health Physical Therapy

 

How Do I Know If I Need Pelvic Health Therapy?

At Great Northern we have a dedicated space for treating issues specific to women’s and male pelvic health. 

We are passionate about treating women’s health because we believe it is underrepresented in the population and it is something that we can treat effectively. We want to allow all women and men to feel confident and able to stay as active as they would like!

If you are interested in more details about what we treat click on the links below.

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Our expert team of physical therapists have over 65 years of combined expertise.

I had a wonderful experience working with Kate Dolan in 2021. I was experiencing urinary “urgency” and signed up for Pelvic Floor Physical Therapy with Kate. Kate is a fantastic teacher. Within a few sessions, I had no more episodes of “I’m going to pee my pants, now.” As a bonus, Kate also helped me a lot with lifelong constipation issues.

I really think every woman should do a few sessions of pelvic floor PT--you learn so much. At Great Northern, I’ve also had great experiences working with Christian Appel for my frozen shoulder and knee arthritis, and with Jim Sykes for bike fitting (a much-needed service in Bozeman). I will return to Great Northern for any PT needs in the future. (So many activities, so many joints, so many years behind me; the next injury can’t be too far off, haha.)”

– Lisa

Urinary Incontinence

Stress Incontinence

An involuntary leakage of urine with coughing, sneezing, laughing, jumping and/or exercising. With these activities there is an increase in intra-abdominal pressure, and if the pelvic floor muscles are not strong enough to hold in the urine, leakage can occur. Physical therapy can help by strengthening the muscles of the pelvic floor to help decrease urine leakage.

Urge Incontinence

A sudden urge to urinate and/or leakage of urine when you have the urge and can’t make it to the bathroom on time. Physical therapy can help teach urge suppression techniques to retrain the brain, bladder, and pelvic floor to decrease urgency.

Mixed incontinence
A combination of both stress incontinence and urge incontinence. Physical therapy can help by strengthening the muscles of the pelvic floor to decrease leakage and can help with urge suppression techniques to retrain the brain, bladder, and pelvic floor to decrease urgency.
Painful Bladder Syndrome
Also called interstitial cystitis. This is chronic pelvic pressure, pain or discomfort that is perceived to be related to the bladder. Physical therapy can help calm down the bladder and the muscles of the pelvic floor to decrease pain.

Prenatal and Postpartum Physical Therapy

Sacroiliac Joint Dysfunction and Low Back Pain

Pregnancy hormones cause laxity in the joints which can lead to sacroiliac joint dysfunction and lower back pain during the pregnancy and postpartum period. A physical therapist can assess these joints and provide interventions to stabilize the joints and decrease pain.

Diastasis Recti

A separation of the abdominal muscles that can occur during pregnancy. This can lead to decreased core stabilization and pain. A physical therapist can assess the degree of the separation and provide interventions to decrease the separation and increase core stability.

Pain with Nursing
Upper back, lower back and shoulder pain with nursing. Physical therapy can help address postural issues and nursing positions to help decrease pain.

Prenatal and Postpartum Physical Therapy 

Sacroiliac Joint Dysfunction and Low Back Pain

Pregnancy hormones cause laxity in the joints which can lead to sacroiliac joint dysfunction and lower back pain during the pregnancy and postpartum period. A physical therapist can assess these joints and provide interventions to stabilize the joints and decrease pain.

Diastasis Recti

A separation of the abdominal muscles that can occur during pregnancy. This can lead to decreased core stabilization and pain. A physical therapist can assess the degree of the separation and provide interventions to decrease the separation and increase core stability.

Pain with Nursing
Upper back, lower back and shoulder pain with nursing. Physical therapy can help address postural issues and nursing positions to help decrease pain.

Pelvic Pain

Pain with Intercourse

Also called dyspareunia. Pain can also be with any penetration. A physical therapist can assess the muscles of the pelvic floor to look for any trigger points or tight bands of muscle that can be released. They can also help with “down training” the muscles to help relax.

Vulvodynia

Pain around the Vulva. A physical therapist can help assess the muscles of the pelvic floor to look for any tenderness. They can assist with understanding the science of pain and muscle “downtraining” and relaxation techniques to decrease the sensitivity of the vulva.

Painful Bladder Syndrome
Also called interstitial cystitis. This is chronic pelvic pressure, pain or discomfort that is perceived to be related to the bladder. Physical therapy can help calm down the bladder and the muscles of the pelvic floor to decrease pain.
PCOS
Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome is a hormonal disorder causing enlarged ovaries with small cysts on the outer edges. Many women experience pain associated with this syndrome and physical therapy can treat this pain by assessing the muscles of the pelvic floor to look for any trigger points or tight bands of muscle that can be released. They can also help with “downtraining” the muscles to help relax.
Endometriosis
Can be a painful a condition in which tissue similar to the endometrium is found outside the uterus on other parts of the body.  A physical therapist can treat the pain associated with this condition by assessing the muscles of the pelvic floor to look for any trigger points or tight bands of muscle that can be released. They can also help with “downtraining” the muscles to help the muscles relax.
Rectal Pain

Pain in the rectum with or without the emptying of stools. Physical therapy can help with proper toileting position and also with pain and trigger points in the rectum and anal area.

Pudendal Neuralgia
Pelvic nerve pain. The pudendal nerve innervates the muscles of the pelvic floor. This nerve can become irritated which can lead to nerve pain in the pelvic muscles. A physical therapist can assess this nerve and help you with strategies to decrease the nerve irritation in the pelvic floor.

Fecal Incontinence

An involuntary emptying of bowels. Physical therapy can help strengthen the muscles of the pelvic floor to hold in the feces. Physical therapy can also help with activity modification, toileting techniques, and other strategies related to defecation  to help with the incontinence.

Fecal Urgency

A sudden urge to defecate. Physical therapy can help with strategies to decrease urgency and strengthen the muscles of the pelvic floor to help with urgency episodes.

Incomplete Emptying

Incomplete emptying of the bowels. This occurs when only part of the feces is evacuated. Physical therapy can help with proper toileting techniques, positions, and strengthening to increase the complete emptying of the bowels.

Fecal Leakage
Involuntary leakage of feces, either throughout the day or with passing gas, coughing, sneezing, laughing or exercising. Physical therapy can help with strategies to decrease leakage as well as pelvic floor strengthening.
Constipation
Difficulty emptying the bowels, usually associated with hardened stool. Physical therapy can help with proper toileting techniques, positions to decrease constipation, and any associated pain.
Rectal Pain
Pain in the rectum with or without the emptying of stools. Physical therapy can help with proper toileting position and also with pain and trigger points in the rectum and anal area.

Fecal Incontinence

An involuntary emptying of bowels. Physical therapy can help strengthen the muscles of the pelvic floor to hold in the feces. Physical therapy can also help with activity modification, toileting techniques, and other strategies related to defecation  to help with the incontinence.

Fecal Urgency

A sudden urge to defecate. Physical therapy can help with strategies to decrease urgency and strengthen the muscles of the pelvic floor to help with urgency episodes.

Incomplete Emptying

Incomplete emptying of the bowels. This occurs when only part of the feces is evacuated. Physical therapy can help with proper toileting techniques, positions, and strengthening to increase the complete emptying of the bowels.

Fecal Leakage
Involuntary leakage of feces, either throughout the day or with passing gas, coughing, sneezing, laughing or exercising. Physical therapy can help with strategies to decrease leakage as well as pelvic floor strengthening.
Constipation
Difficulty emptying the bowels, usually associated with hardened stool. Physical therapy can help with proper toileting techniques, positions to decrease constipation, and any associated pain.
Rectal Pain
Pain in the rectum with or without the emptying of stools. Physical therapy can help with proper toileting position and also with pain and trigger points in the rectum and anal area.

Male Pelvic Pain

Prostatitis

An inflammation or infection of the prostate gland. Physical therapy can treat the symptoms associated with prostatitis. These symptoms include the frequent urge to urinate, pain with urination and difficulty urinating.

BPH

Benign Prostate Hyperplasia, or enlarged prostate affects up to 90% of men. Physical therapy can treat symptoms associated with BPH such as the need to urinate frequently and/or pain with urination

Erectile Dysfunction

Physical therapy can be utilized as a non-invasive treatment for Erectile Dysfunction. Physical therapy will help to increase the strength of the pelvic floor muscles which can help with regaining normal erections.

Breast Care

Physical therapy can help with pain and scar management post mastectomy by addressing any adhesions in the tissue and increasing  the mobility of the scar. Physical therapy can also help with axillary webbing as a result of mastectomy and cancer treatments.

Lymphedema

Lymphedema is a condition that is caused by a dysfunction of the lymphatic system.  This can be a result of trauma, damage to the lymphatics, or the result of surgery or radiation.

Breast Care

Many women experience breast pain that is not associated with any abnormal findings on a mammogram. Physical therapy can help by assessing and treating the musculature surrounding the breast tissue.

Breast Care

Physical therapy can help with pain and scar management post mastectomy by addressing any adhesions in the tissue and increasing  the mobility of the scar. Physical therapy can also help with axillary webbing as a result of mastectomy and cancer treatments.

Lymphedema

Lymphedema is a condition that is caused by a dysfunction of the lymphatic system.  This can be a result of trauma, damage to the lymphatics, or the result of surgery or radiation.

Breast Care

Many women experience breast pain that is not associated with any abnormal findings on a mammogram. Physical therapy can help by assessing and treating the musculature surrounding the breast tissue.

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Reviews

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I have come to Great Northern off and on for several years but this past year I had two knee replacements 6 months apart and had many appointments during that time. My recovery was outstanding both times but I also appreciated the personal care and the way my sometimes-changing challenges were addressed. I thought there a great balance between understanding where I was at but pushing me to do a little better. I worked with Kara mostly over this past year but have also worked with James and a couple others. I think all the therapists were knowledgeable and helpful and I would definitely recommend them. As I age, I’m sure I will be back but I’m confident they will be there for me.

Cynthia

Patient

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I had a wonderful experience working with Kate Dolan in 2021. I was experiencing urinary "urgency" and signed up for Pelvic Floor Physical Therapy with Kate. Kate is a fantastic teacher. Within a few sessions, I had no more episodes of "I'm going to pee my pants, now." As a bonus, Kate also helped me a lot with lifelong constipation issues. I really think every woman should do a few sessions of pelvic floor PT--you learn so much. At Great Northern, I've also had great experiences working with Christian Appel for my frozen shoulder and knee arthritis, and with Jim Sykes for bike fitting (a much-needed service in Bozeman). I will return to Great Northern for any PT needs in the future. (So many activities, so many joints, so many years behind me; the next injury can't be too far off, haha.)

Lisa

Patient

{
Started PT with Christian Appel here for strengthening a-three-times-operated-on left shoulder that hurt just about all the time whenever I moved it or lifted anything. Christian commits his full time and attention to me each time I've been in. He is patient and kind. My shoulder is much stronger and more functional. It feels really good and solid. We're close to ending our sessions but more range of motion and strength apparently is available. The gym is spacious, airy and bright, and the equipment in it covers a broad range of needs. The administration is great, keeping me well-reminded of my appointments and being available and helpful when I need to reschedule or have other questions about my care. I have had plenty of interactions with others on staff and all of them have been wonderful. I've had PT at several Bozeman providers and I place GNPT at the top of them all by a wide margin. Highly recommend.

Bill

Patient

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